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5a1c4875aa269 CLICK THE IMAGE TO VIEW THE SLIDESHOW Hailey Hafner, Elizabeth Shenberger & Tiffany Deen presenting author research.
Ella Ingram, Sydni Badertscher & Nevaeh Houston presenting author research.
Anthony Hord, Jeremie Hefran & Logan Slater presenting research.
Kiyan Lynn, Lane Norman & Alex Ryia researching information for poster project.
Ethan Shelton, Joseph Santiago, Kaleb Sanders & Patrick Wichman researching info for poster project.
Cadence Albee, Jenna Greenfield & Bailey Sterling researching info for poster project.
CLICK THE IMAGE TO VIEW THE SLIDESHOW Hailey Hafner, Elizabeth Shenberger & Tiffany Deen presenting author research.

Mrs. Griseta - Classroom Spotlight

What are the story elements and how do they contribute to the development of plot? How does an author develop the narrator’s point of view in a fictional story? How do individual sentences or chapters contribute to the development of theme, setting and plot in a fictional story?  These are all essential questions students will answer during unit two. As students  prepare to read the novel, “The Watsons Go to Birmingham-1963,” they have researched various information about the author which includes background information (home town, family), education, past jobs before becoming an author, other books the author has written, awards he’s received, and additional fun facts about Curtis. “The Watsons Go to Birmingham-1963,” is a heartwarming novel about a loving family dealing with a delinquent teenager, Byron, and the challenges of racial discrimination during their visit to Grandma Sands in Birmingham. Throughout our unit, we’ll practice identifying character traits which describe the main characters and examine ways in which the main characters change over the course of the story, learn the story elements and elements of literature and identify how each fits into the novel. In addition, students will practice vocabulary skills by identifying and determining the meaning of new words, analyze conflict that characters experience throughout the novel, recognize important events in the text and last, make connections to the characters they are able to relate to.

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